Cedar House: The Guesthouse Where People Learn to Live Together Once More

05.09.2018

©Yoshino-cho

Designed as part of the Kenya Hara House Vision exhibition in Tokyo and created in collaboration with Tokyo-based architect Go Hasegawa, Cedar House explores how architecture can forge new relationships between hosts and guests. This building goes beyond the traditional model of a guesthouse, focusing on the whole community rather than an individual host.

At Cedar House, travellers live right in the heart of the community. This means that guests who book to stay there will live with the residents who look after the house. The benefits of each booking is redistributed amongst the community. The house is therefore more than just a physical space; it’s a place for sharing and living together.

Every detail of the structure, from the locally milled wood to the communal dining table, creates a link with the residents of Yoshino and their traditions. For instance, the fish are caught in the river that lies a stone’s throw from the building, and the wood used for the structures (cedar, hence the house’s name) comes from the forests that surround the village (there are 40 sawmills in the area). Everything is local and draws on resources from the region.

©Yoshino-cho

©Yoshino-cho

©Yoshino-cho