HOBBY TOOLS HARBORING EDO-NESS

TOPICS

HOBBY TOOLS HARBORING EDO-NESS

NEW

Bamboo sticks of varying thickness are brought together to form a fishing rod. The artisans who make these rods use what is called a jointed fishing rod construction, which pole makers developed during the Edo period. It’s also known as Edo Fishing Rods. Edo, now Tokyo, has many canals and faces and faced the Pacific Ocean, so it harbored a variety of fish. Since that time a variety of poles have passed through history targeting specific fish and fishing methods. Some of the materials used for this task include monk’s belly or fish pole bamboo, arrow bamboo, and black bamboo.

After drying for three years, bamboo stock passes through a processing phase to become wazao. An important part of this process is smelting to correct kinks and bends followed by igniting it to add strength. Shapes and thickness play an important role in choosing the right sticks for the rods, as well as the cutting and assembly. The craftsmanship one sees in these rods can’t be found in modern carbon poles. Painted lacquer coupled with bamboo’s natural color brings out a unique hue with a smooth, shiny gloss.

Some of the finest pieces include metal chasing and other decorations that could arouse the latent fisherman in any of us. Bamboo’s sensitivity conveys even the most delicate motion from a fish, and its strength can handle even the strongest pulls on the line. Superb capabilities combined with exquisite craftsmanship, the Edo Fishing Rods continues to inspire fishermen around the world.

EDO FISHING RODS/江戸和竿

SERIES

PERSISTENCE IN PROTECTING TRADITION TOPICS

Glass production methods came to Japan around the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries via Portugal, the Netherlands, and China. It was the early eighteenth century when Edo Glass came into existence, primarily focusing …

THE TIP OF TRADITION: EDO BRUSHES TOPICS

Edo Brushes first appeared in 1732 in the Bankin Sugiwai Bukuro product directory. The catalog displayed an array of shapes and sizes as one would expect, and, while the company marketed them as Edo Brushes, they had a …

PREMIUM TEXTURE, PREMIUM CRAFTWORK TOPICS

Circa 1874, during the Meiji era, copies of French hairbrushes began popping up in shops around Japan. At first, these hairbrushes were called Western Brushes. Later, they went into mass production churning out machinem…

DOLLS OF VITALITY TOPICS

Edo. The name of the capital city before it took the name Tokyo. The craftsmen of the Edo period laid the foundation for Tokyo to adopt the western culture and further ripen it. The traditional crafts of Tokyo continue …

アセット 1