Roberto Badin, Capturing Emptiness Among the Crowds

27.02.2019

WordsRebecca Zissmann

©Roberto Badin

Roberto Badin has the unique talent of being able to create the illusion of calm emptiness among the busiest spaces across Japan. Through his lens, incongruous spaces, like the operating theatre of a hospital, come alive. The Brazilian photographer brings out the geometry and intersecting lines of a space, making them the main subject of his architecturally-inspired images.

I believe in the strength of the imagination of an image, more than the narrative description. However, the framing is already a bias, a personal act that involves more emotion rather than reason.’

On the rare occasions that people feature in his photographs, they are captured from a distance, and depicted only as a reminder of scale, such as a policeman on the beat, dwarfed by a large orange building.

Badin portrays a vision of Japan that he has long admired as a ‘distant planet’ since his childhood in Brazil in the 1970s. He first visited the archipelago in 2016, before returning in 2018 following a commission from the independent publisher Benjamin Blanck. Together they built a collection of images which would constitute the book Inside Japan also translated into Japanese.

The photographer explains that he didn’t wish to work in a way that would make him a sort of image thief, capturing scenes of the East to exhibit in the West. But while the pair are hoping for Japanese exhibition in the near future, in the meantime Badin’s work is on display at the Hôtel Jules et Jim in Paris until 12 March.

©Roberto Badin

©Roberto Badin

©Roberto Badin

©Roberto Badin

©Roberto Badin

Hôtel Jules et Jim

11, rue des gravilliers – 75003 PARIS

Until 12 March 2019

www.hoteljulesetjim.com/en/#13