The Musée d’Ennery: a Trove of Japanese Treasures

12.01.2019

WordsManon Baeza

Courtesy of musée d'Ennery

The Musée d’Ennery, a former private mansion owned by Clémence and Adophe Philippe d’Ennery, is a real time machine for visitors, allowing them to step back in time and discover a unique, rare collection.

Located in Paris’s 16th arrondissement, not far from the Arc de triomphe, this museum offers a different view of Japanese history and aesthetics. Hundreds of ceramics, masks, netsuke and porcelain objects can be found in magnificent Vietnamese wooden cabinets, some of which have been reassembled with sculptures. Some of the display cases are adorned with fish, recalling Japanese temples.

The Musée d’Ennery represents the taste of an era and, more particularly, of Clémence d’Ennery. ‘All her life, she wanted to recreate a magical environment, like a theatre set’, explains Michel Maucuer, curator of the Japan section of the museum. There are almost 3000 pieces, each one more phantasmagorical than the last. ‘The International Netsuke Society often come here, almost like a pilgrimage’, Maucuer reveals.

This museum is ‘designed for delectation and delight’ and displays, in an incredible architectural setting, some unique masterpieces. The museum is only open by reservation on Saturday morning, so booking is essential for those who wish to visit, as it holds a maximum of just 19 people at once.

Courtesy of musée d'Ennery

Courtesy of musée d'Ennery

Courtesy of musée d'Ennery

Courtesy of musée d'Ennery

Musée d'Ennery

59 avenue Foch 75116 Paris

01 56 52 54 33

www.guimet.fr