An Exhibition Retracing the Career of Calligrapher Yuichi Inoue in 76 Works

29.10.2018

Yu-ichi Inoue, Ai (Amour), 1972, collection privée, photo : Tokio Ito

He’s described as ‘one of the most creative representatives of Japan’s post-war artistic avant-garde’. The exhibition, located in Albi, will present his main masterpieces and the monochrome universe he created from two tools: paper and Chinese ink.

Yuichi Inoue, a former teacher, studied for eight years under talented calligrapher Ueda Sokyu. In 1952, he founded the Bokunjinkai group with some of his fellow students in which they considered new ideas in art and painting but also in philosophy and literature, in both the East and West. His first works feature just a single character. He had a fondness for characters which he would repeat over and over again: ai (love), hana (flower) and hin (poverty).

Yuichi Inoue passed away in 1985 but his work on the primitive language and abstract shapes make him one of the major figures in Japanese art. Thirty-five years on from his death, our imagination does the rest.

 

Yu-ichi Inoue, Yodaka no Hoshi (L’Étoile du faucon de la nuit), 1984, The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, photo : Tokio Ito

Yu-ichi Inoue, Hin (Dénuement), 1972, The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, photo : Tokio Ito

Yu-ichi Inoue, Tsuki (Lune), 1982, collection privée, photo : Tokio Ito

Yu-ichi Inoue, Ah Yokokawa Kokumin- gakkô (Ah ! L’école primaire de Yokokawa), 1978, The Museum of Modern Art, Gunma, photo : Tokio Ito 

Yuichi Inoue exhibition

September 19 to December 17 2018

Toulouse-Lautrec museum, Albi